Don’t Make New Year’s Resolutions! (Here’s What To Do Instead)

I stopped making New Year’s resolutions a while ago.  They never last, and they are just a huge source of frustration.

Think about it.  What was your resolution last year?  Did you keep it?  Did you lose weight, start exercising, spend less, save more?

There are lots of industries that count on you NOT keeping your resolution.  The fitness industry charges an annual membership fee but lots of gym members stop going after 4-6 weeks (if that).  Failure is very lucrative for the weight loss industry, right?

Behavior change is incredibly hard.  Why set yourself up for failure?  Use these 4 suggestion to set a goal that IS doable for you!

Short term

A year is too long for a meaningful goal.  Chop that goal up into manageable, bite-sized chunks.  Remember, how do you eat an elephant?  One bite at a time!

It is fine to say “I want to lose 30 pounds by next Christmas”.  However, that is a HUGE goal and it would be easy to procrastinate.  Set a 1-month and 3-month goal so you can keep the finish line in sight and stay motivated.


Don’t set vague goals.  Be VERY specific.  In our weight loss example you might say “I will lose 5 pounds by the end of January.”

The next question is “How am I going to do that?”  Easy to say “Eat right and exercise more.”  That is WAY too vague.  A better goal would be “I’m going to sign up for Betty Rocker’s 30-day fitness challenge at and commit to 15 minutes per day to get stronger and more fit.”

(BTW I’m personally planning to do the Make Fat Cry Challenge starting on New Year’s Day.  NO, I’m not posting before-and-after pics, LOL!)


Make sure before you set a specific, short-term goal that it’s something you can ACTUALLY do.  If you have chronic foot and ankle pain, committing to run a marathon in the spring might not be realistic.

Do you have the finances to eat all-organic?  Can you commit the time to cook all your meals at home?  Or would it be better to commit to choose grilled rather than fried foods and vegetables rather than starchy sides when eating at restaurants?

This isn’t to say you shouldn’t set aggressive goals.  I’m all for shooting for the moon!  Even if you don’t quite make it, you’ll still have made huge progress, right?  It’s all about balance, though.  If your goal is too aggressive you might get frustrated and give up.


Part of making your goal specific is making it measurable.  Betty Rocker recommended we take a calendar or white-board and put a big X through each day as we complete our daily workout.  Seeing measurable progress is a great motivator!

If you have a weight loss goal make sure to NOT have all your measuring happen on the scale.  Take your tape measure and write down your inches because in those plateau periods where you’re not seeing progress on the scale, often your clothes will be fitting differently and you can see progress in your inches instead.

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions anymore because I’ve seen too many people (myself included) set resolutions and fail to keep them.  Instead I set measurable, realistic, specific short-term goals and do my best to knock them out of the park!

QUESTION: What specific, measurable, realistic short-term goal will you set for yourself for the next 1 to 3 months?  Comment and tell me about it!