Rising Rates Of Babies Suffocating In Bed

As a mom (twice!) I understand all too well the lure of cuddling your new baby while they are sleeping.  There is nothing sweeter than holding that sleeping newborn and enjoying ever breath, every twitch, every murmur.

But I also remember the sleep deprivation, the effort it took just to shower and put on clean clothes, the middle-of-the-night feedings where I nearly fell asleep in the glider while nursing.  Shopping, laundry, cooking, relatively simple tasks were two or three times harder than they should be just because I was SO. BLOODY. TIRED!

I know I’m not alone.  All new moms and dads go through this.  That fatigue and sleep deprivation is one of the main reasons why doctors discourage the practice of parents bed-sharing with their newborn.  And when parents cosleep with newborns, we see rising rates of babies suffocating in bed.

A research paper published in JAMA Pediatrics this week reports that rates of babies suffocating in bed have more than doubled in the last 16 years.  Unfortunately the rate of rise is even higher among African-American babies and in babies living in rural areas.  Hispanic babies are less at risk.  The overall rate was about 28 per 100,000 people in 2015.  This means that in 2015 about 1100 babies died from being suffocated in bed.

SIDS deaths have fallen from about 70 per 100,000 to about 40 per 100,000 over the same period.  The reasons for SIDS deaths are not fully understood, but the reason why a baby would suffocate in bed is pretty clear.  A parent rolls on them, or a pillow falls on them, or they get stuck between the mattress and the wall.

Cases of babies suffocating in bed are entirely preventable.  The simple measure of NOT having a baby in bed with their parent(s) goes a long way towards prevention.  Pediatricians and family doctors have advised new parents for years to put their baby to sleep on their back in a crib or bassinet.  A separate bed is the safest place for a new baby to sleep.

Parents cosleep for many reasons.  More well-to-do parents may cosleep because they believe it will improve bonding and make breastfeeding easier to establish and more successful.  Lower-income parents may cosleep because there simply isn’t money to buy a separate crib or bed for the new baby.

Finland started a program in the 1930s for all mothers-to-be to receive a box of supplies for their new babies.  The cardboard “baby box” also contained a firm foam mattress with a tight-fitting sheet, making the box itself a bassinet for the new baby.

In 2017 Ohio became the second state to offer a similar program to expectant parents in our state.  By going to Baby Box Company’s website and watching a 10-15 minute video and taking a short quiz, Ohio expectant moms and dads will be able to receive their own baby box.

The video and quiz help to educate expectant parents on safe sleep practices.  The box gives the new baby a safe and portable place to sleep for the first few weeks of life.

If you or someone you know are expecting a baby, please educate yourself about safe sleep practices.  Grandparents and babysitters need to know the safest way to put a baby to sleep.  Even a short nap can be deadly.

  • Go to Baby Box University and complete the short educational program to qualify for your free Baby Box.
  • Always put your baby down alone, on their back, on a firm sleep surface.  Babies should sleep without blankets, pillows, comforters or stuffed animals.
  • Do not cosleep.  Do not nap on a couch or recliner with your baby.  If you’re breastfeeding and up frequently at night, do not breastfeed a newborn while lying down.  Sit up in a chair to breastfeed then put your baby back in his or her bassinet, crib or Pack-n-Play (or bed box!) before lying down again.

After all, one baby suffocated in bed with their parents is too many.  1100 babies suffocating in bed per year is a horrible tragedy that can be prevented with proper sleep practices.

QUESTION: Did you cosleep with your baby?  Why or why not?

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