Meditation For Stress Relief

I’m happy (I think) to report that a major milestone has been reached in my family.  My older son is 15 1/2 years old and yesterday got his temporary driver’s permit.  So it begins!  I may never draw a stress-and-anxiety-free breath again!  He hasn’t had his first lesson and already I’m worried…

In the stress and anxiety department I know I’m not alone.  Would it be fair to say that all of my readers are under some stress?  Yep, pretty much.  Stress is a way of life nowadays.

For those of us who are parents, stress makes our tempers short and tolerance low.  It makes us snap at our kids and keeps us from enjoying our time with them.  It also can lead us to overeat and indulge in other activities that aren’t good for us OR our families.

There are many ways to reduce stress.  Learning time and task management skills, decreasing commitments, and practicing gratitude are some ways.  Some people choose  to take medication.

There is also very good evidence that meditation for stress relief is effective.  Why would meditation be helpful when under stress?

First I want to review a little physiology.  Bear with me, it will help you understand why meditation is helpful.  There is a component of your nervous system that is called the autonomic nervous system.  Its job is to control all of the things that happen in your body without you thinking about them, like breathing, heart rate, circulation, digestion, sweating, bowel and bladder function and sexual activity (once triggered by conscious thought).

The autonomic nervous system also is divided into two components: the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system.  The sympathetic nervous system is activated with stress, and brings out the “fight or flight” response.  Blood pressure, respiratory rate and heart rate go up, pupils dilate, circulation is directed away from the digestive tract and towards the brain and muscles (preparing to fight or flee from a threat).  The adrenal glands dump adrenaline into the blood stream.  If stress lasts awhile the adrenals also make cortisol to increase blood sugar production by the liver.

Can you see why chronic sympthetic activation is a bad thing?  Having the blood pressure and heart rate high is really hard on the circulatory system.  Adrenaline itself seems over time to be poisonous to the heart.  Chronic stress is hard on the digestive tract, leading to irritable bowel syndrome.  High cortisol levels can lead to weight gain and diabetes.

So how do you calm down the sympathetic nervous system?

One way is to activate the parasympathetic nervous system.  If sympathetic is “fight or flight,” parasympathetic is “rest and digest.”  One of the most effective ways to purposely activate the parasympathetic nervous system is to meditate.

Meditation has been shown to produce improvement in mood disorders, epilepsy, autoimmune symptoms, menopause symptoms and PMS symptoms.

There are many ways to meditate.  Some well-known techniques include Transcendental Meditation, mindfulness-based stress reduction, various types of Buddhist meditation, and Metta meditation.  All forms of meditation seek to calm the mind, go beyond the mind and enhance concentration.  The physical health benefits are very well documented.

Like many other areas of life, to get the most out of meditation you need a good teacher.  I’d like to recommend to you that, if you’re in the Cleveland area, you should consider MY teacher.  We have a beginning meditation class starting soon.

Dr. Vincent Gentiluomo is a skilled martial artist and spiritual teacher.  You can learn more about him and his background at this link.  He offers both group classes and individual teaching.  If you would like more information, you can contact him via email at or by phone at 440–773–4004.  He can help you choose the program that’s right for you.

If you’re finding yourself struggling with stress and its effects on your body, meditation is one effective way to reduce your stress and bring your body back into balance.

For more information about the biology of stress, check this link.

QUESTION:  Do you meditate?  How has it helped you?


Don’t Make New Year’s Resolutions! (Here’s What To Do Instead)

I stopped making New Year’s resolutions a while ago.  They never last, and they are just a huge source of frustration.

Think about it.  What was your resolution last year?  Did you keep it?  Did you lose weight, start exercising, spend less, save more?

There are lots of industries that count on you NOT keeping your resolution.  The fitness industry charges an annual membership fee but lots of gym members stop going after 4-6 weeks (if that).  Failure is very lucrative for the weight loss industry, right?

Behavior change is incredibly hard.  Why set yourself up for failure?  Use these 4 suggestion to set a goal that IS doable for you!

Short term

A year is too long for a meaningful goal.  Chop that goal up into manageable, bite-sized chunks.  Remember, how do you eat an elephant?  One bite at a time!

It is fine to say “I want to lose 30 pounds by next Christmas”.  However, that is a HUGE goal and it would be easy to procrastinate.  Set a 1-month and 3-month goal so you can keep the finish line in sight and stay motivated.


Don’t set vague goals.  Be VERY specific.  In our weight loss example you might say “I will lose 5 pounds by the end of January.”

The next question is “How am I going to do that?”  Easy to say “Eat right and exercise more.”  That is WAY too vague.  A better goal would be “I’m going to sign up for Betty Rocker’s 30-day fitness challenge at and commit to 15 minutes per day to get stronger and more fit.”

(BTW I’m personally planning to do the Make Fat Cry Challenge starting on New Year’s Day.  NO, I’m not posting before-and-after pics, LOL!)


Make sure before you set a specific, short-term goal that it’s something you can ACTUALLY do.  If you have chronic foot and ankle pain, committing to run a marathon in the spring might not be realistic.

Do you have the finances to eat all-organic?  Can you commit the time to cook all your meals at home?  Or would it be better to commit to choose grilled rather than fried foods and vegetables rather than starchy sides when eating at restaurants?

This isn’t to say you shouldn’t set aggressive goals.  I’m all for shooting for the moon!  Even if you don’t quite make it, you’ll still have made huge progress, right?  It’s all about balance, though.  If your goal is too aggressive you might get frustrated and give up.


Part of making your goal specific is making it measurable.  Betty Rocker recommended we take a calendar or white-board and put a big X through each day as we complete our daily workout.  Seeing measurable progress is a great motivator!

If you have a weight loss goal make sure to NOT have all your measuring happen on the scale.  Take your tape measure and write down your inches because in those plateau periods where you’re not seeing progress on the scale, often your clothes will be fitting differently and you can see progress in your inches instead.

I don’t believe in New Year’s resolutions anymore because I’ve seen too many people (myself included) set resolutions and fail to keep them.  Instead I set measurable, realistic, specific short-term goals and do my best to knock them out of the park!

QUESTION: What specific, measurable, realistic short-term goal will you set for yourself for the next 1 to 3 months?  Comment and tell me about it!


I Was On The Radio!

Hi, everyone!

This week I did something new – I was invited to be a guest on my friend’s internet radio show.  She is a runner, and we talked about a number of things related to that topic.

Please click this link to check out the podcast!

Listen to find out:

  • The most common runners’ injury, and how it is treated
  • The most common nutritional problem runners face
  • What do penguins have to do with running?
  • And more!

Thanks so much Alanna, Karen and Laz for the fun time 🙂

QUESTION: Do you want to hear me do more podcasts? Do you like video blogs?  Or do you prefer text (written) blogs?


Boo! Healthy Halloween Treats For You!

Happy Halloween everybody!  I LOVE Halloween 🙂  Costumes and boisterous kids and, yes, treats.  If you come in to the office on Halloween you’ll see that my office really gets into the spirit.  Nope, I’m not going to tell you what my costume is.  Maybe I’ll post a pic on my Facebook page on Tuesday 🙂

The downside of Halloween is that it starts the snack-food feeding frenzy that doesn’t end until New Year’s Day.  It’s a constant parade of sweets and treats for the next two months.  VERY difficult for those of us who are conscious of our weight and our health.

Fear not!  There are plenty of healthy Halloween treats available!  Here are a few ideas of how to help your kids (and your neighbors) have a happy healthy Halloween!

1.  Dark chocolate:  Dark chocolate is MUCH better for you than milk chocolate.  It has more antioxidants and helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure.

2.  Portion-packs of apple slices, pretzels, raisins, trail mix or nuts.  Make sure to ask if nuts are OK, some children are allergic.

3.  Dried fruit:  Banana chips, freeze-dried strawberries, pineapple, raisins, so many possibilities!  Sweet and MUCH healthier than candy!

4.  Carrot sticks:  Sweet and crunchy, and oh so good for you!  Full of fiber and vitamin A for healthy skin and eyesight.

5.  Popcorn balls:  Also high in fiber, popcorn balls are available at this time of year in factory-sealed packages for trick-or-treaters.

I found an awesome YouTube video from The Vegan View with four different awesome idea for healthy Halloween-themed treats.  These would be great to make with kids.  Check it out!  (And their costumes are so cute!)

Here’s a photo of the most adorable Halloween treats I’ve seen this fall, courtesy of Pinterest!a8947aaa1fb9b9debe8a096ef0561147Make sure you set aside some time to stay active, and eat a healthy meal with the kids before they head out trick-or-treating.  Send the kids out with a SMALL bag and encourage them to take only one piece of candy at each house.  After they get home, consider having them choose their favorites to keep and then have a “candy buy-back” for cash, a gift card, or a special privilege.

Have fun, stay safe, and be healthy!

Question:  Are you planning to take any steps to “limit the damage” to your health this Halloween?  Please share your ideas below!


How To Take Care Of A Cancer Patient

Most of you know that my husband Russ has been battling multiple myeloma for the last 6 1/2 years.  What you may not know is that although he was in remission without treatment for over 3 years, this summer the cancer unfortunately relapsed.

Of course, as his wife, my focus is doing everything I can to keep him healthy and make this next leg of the journey as successful as possible.  What can I do to help him?  I’d like to share with you some of what I’ve learned about how to take care of a cancer patient.

The sad reality is that we will all, at some point in our lives have a close friend or family member struggle with a life-threatening illness.  Knowing how to help them is a useful skill and can make us caregivers feel less helpless.

Make sure they eat, drink, get fresh air and rest

Whether you feel like a bully or not is irrelevant.  Cancer patients need to eat.  Simple, fresh, nutritious food that is easy to grab and go should be available all the time.  Keep in mind that cancer treatment often changes the sense of taste.  The patient’s favorite foods may not taste good to them, and they may get weird cravings.  Stay flexible.

Sandwiches, soups, fresh fruit and veggies, oatmeal, scrambled eggs and calorie-dense foods like nuts and nut butters are good choices.  Good fats like avocado hide easily in blender smoothies.  Protein smoothies (non-GMO soy is better than when as a protein source) are a good protein source.  Be careful with meat, it’s hard to digest and may make nausea worse.

Staying hydrated is important.  Water is the best way to hydrate but iced tea is good too and adding lemon or lime juice can make plain water less boring.  Don’t rely on soda because neither added sugar nor artificial sweeteners are healthy choices.  Sports hydration drinks are OK if the patient has diarrhea but choose one that doesn’t have artificial sweeteners or colors (Shaklee Hydrate is my choice!).

Sleep is tough.  Many cancer patients don’t sleep well, because of symptoms, treatment effects and stress.  Talk to their doctor if they’re having trouble sleeping, medications can help.

Also don’t underestimate the importance of getting outside.  Nature is healing and too much hibernation is not good.  Russ’s first outing after being in the hospital in 2011 was to the Yankee Peddler Festival.  Granted, he spent a lot of time holding down benches and tree stumps, and we didn’t stay long, but he was in the fresh air and sunshine, and we were together as a family.

Take care of yourself too

As I’ve written before, one of the first orders of business when you are a caregiver is to take care of yourself.  If you are exhausted you won’t be able to take good care of your loved one.  You can’t pour from an empty cup!

Eat and drink as you should.  Get enough rest.  Get outside, with or without your loved one.  Exercise.  Recharge your batteries by doing what you enjoy as often as you can.

Vent OUT, not IN

Not long ago, I read a really good article that was sort of about the etiquette of being around someone struggling with a serious illness.  I can’t find the article right now, but the gist of it is this.

Imagine a bull’s eye target with the patient in the middle.  Everyone they know is arranged in the rings around them.  Those closest to them, physically and emotionally, are in the smallest rings and as you get farther away you find distant family members, casual acquaintances and those they see in passing.

Their spouse and children are on the smallest ring.  Grown children may be a step out, depending on the relationship.

When you interact with others in relation to the cancer patient, remember that you are on the RECEIVING end from those who are farther in than you are.  For instance, when my mom was sick with breast cancer I had my own fears and anxieties.  My sister and I were terrified we were going to lose our mom.  I didn’t unload on her or my dad about that, though.  My husband or my close friends were my resource to deal with my own fears.  I vented OUT, not IN.

This doesn’t mean that you can’t tell a cancer patient that you’re afraid for them.  You don’t have to be relentlessly cheerful and optimistic all the time.  Just be careful not to add stress to their already overwhelming burden.  When dealing with a cancer patient, your goal is to relieve stress, not increase it.  Let them vent out, take pressure off, don’t increase the pressure.  It’s about them right now, not about you.

Cancer patients have a lot to deal with.  They are juggling treatment schedules, financial worries, physical symptoms and side effects, fears and anxieties.  Some may be continuing to work, like my husband.  They have family responsibilities as well.

There is a lot we can do to support a cancer patient in their journey back to wellness.  Support their health, take care of yourself and find your own support system to help you keep your feet under you.

QUESTION: Did I forget anything?  What has helped you in taking care of person struggling with a serious illness?


Are Multivitamins Dangerous?

I’ve done a TON of physicals this week, and when I see a patient for a well visit, we always talk about diet.  For most (if not all) humans, the best diet is one full of whole fresh unprocessed plant foods, the more colorful the better.  Limiting meats and other animal-based foods is wise if your goal is to decrease your risk of cancer and heart disease.

Even if you eat healthy, it’s hard to get all the nutrients you need from your food.  I always recommend a good quality multivitamin to my patients.  This week a few people have asked me, are multivitamins dangerous?

It’s common to see reports on the news that vitamin use increases the risk of cancer, heart disease, and other problems.  If you follow my blog (or talk to me for a few minutes) you know I believe strongly in good nutrition.  So when people are asking if multivitamins are dangerous, I want to reassure them.

Here on my blog I try not to lean on my own opinion too much.  So I went off to the research database, and found a great article published recently that reviewed recent research about the safety of multivitamin supplements.  You can read the article yourself at this link.

So are multivitamins dangerous?  Here are my 3 take-home points from this article:

  • Nutrition should come from food, but our diet is stupid, so taking a multivitamin is a smart harm-reduction method.

There is no multivitamin or supplement that can overcome a bad diet.  Too much processed food, food full of added sugar and fat, and food with artificial ingredients will damage your health.

With that being said, we live in the real world and there are times when we can’t eat a perfect diet all the time.  Even though we live in a country with fresh healthy food available, often it is grown and stored and transported in such a way that the nutrients degrade.  It’s been reported that our food is much less nutritious than it was 50 years ago.

In this day and age, a multivitamin can be sort of like the seatbelt in your car.  You should eat healthy (like you should drive safely) but your daily multivitamin can be a just-in-case safety measure for those crazy days when you just don’t get all the nutrients you need from your food.

  • Comprehensive multi-nutrient supplements (like a good quality multivitamin) are better and safer than single-nutrient supplement

Some research shows that single-nutrient supplements like calcium and vitamin E are associated with higher risk of some diseases.  I don’t recommend people take single-nutrient supplements.  You’re best off taking a comprehensive nutritional supplement program tailored to your specific needs.

For instance, a woman over 60 would need a good quality multivitamin that doesn’t contain iron.  A younger woman of childbearing age would need more iron, more iodine, and more folic acid in her multivitamin.  Someone with migraines or anxiety may need to add a B complex supplement and extra magnesium.  Someone concerned about heart health may want to add fish oil, coenzyme Q10 and extra magnesium.

People are different, and what works for someone else may not work as well for you.

  • There is no consistent evidence that taking a multivitamin increases the risk of cancer, heart disease or stroke.  There ARE suggestions that taking a multivitamin may reduce the risk of health problems in certain populations.  This is really exciting!

Multivitamins have been studied extensively to see if taking them is associated with lots of different medical problems. The research has been pretty neutral in general, with no association with higher OR lower risk of major medical problems.  This may be because multivitamin preparations vary so widely in quality and in what nutrients are contained in them.

A few consistent trends do seem to be present though.  Multivitamins are not associated with a higher risk of cancer.  Some studies have, in fact, shown a lower risk of cancer in people taking a multivitamin.  Researchers are doing more studies to see if they can show lower cancer risk consistently in those taking multivitamins.

Multivitamins also seem to not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, age-related eye disease, mental health and cognitive problems in the elderly, or overall mortality.

So what’s the overall point?  Take your multivitamin every day!  Even if you have a really healthy diet, a multivitamin will help fill in any gaps.  After all, these nutrients affect every cell in your body.  Every cell needs them, every day.

Need help choosing a multivitamin?  I recently wrote about how to choose a multivitamin, so click this link and read up!

You probably already know I use and recommend supplements from the Shaklee Corporation.  Want to see what products would be best for you?  Click this link and answer the questions to get your HealthPrint personalized nutrition assessment.

QUESTION: Do you take a multivitamin?  Do you feel it makes a difference in your health?


What Is Physician Burnout?

Dr. Sadd is a colleague of mine that I’ve been worrying about for a while.  He comes to the office and constantly complains about EVERYTHING.  Dr. Sadd snaps at the office staff, makes negative comments about his patients, and has no tolerance at all when things don’t run smoothly.  He doesn’t really have “good days” and never seems to be happy.

Dr. Sadd is burned out.

What is physician burnout?  Burnout doesn’t just happen to doctors but is very prevalent in the medical field.  Because of this, research on burnout is often done on doctors and nurses and other medical professionals.

Physician burnout happens when the emotional and energetic toll of practicing medicine becomes overwhelming.  Burned out doctors and nurses are exhausted.  They are cynical and have a hard time connecting with others.  They doubt they are really making a difference.  Those of us in the health professions generally chose the field BECAUSE we want to make a difference.

If not addressed, burnout can drive doctors and nurses out of medicine.  Worse, burnout can cause depression and lead to suicide.  And physician burnout is very common.  Recent studies suggest that over half of American doctors are suffering from burnout.

What are the causes of physician burnout?  Recent changes in the American medical landscape with increased regulation and government reporting requirements are contributing to burnout.  We aren’t secretaries.  When we have to spend more and more time staring into the computer screen instead of interacting with patients, it adds more stress.

Doctors and nurses often feel they have less and less control over the way they practice medicine.  They often feel as though their training and expertise aren’t valued.   Checklists and paperwork, financial pressures and rules that don’t make sense all contribute.  If we don’t have enough support with the clerical side of things we can feel overwhelmed.

In addition, some doctors don’t have a good work-home integration.  Long work hours are hard on the family.  We neglect activities that we enjoy and put more and more energy into work.  Eventually the tank is empty and we have nothing more to give to our patients.

If you have lost the joy you used to take in your work, you might be burned out. You might be burned out if you are dreading going to work tomorrow,   If you find it really hard to finish tasks at work that used to be easy, or if you find yourself procrastinating, you might be burned out.

Unfortunately, if you are a doctor or nurse and you’re burned out, you might actually be dangerous.  Burnout increases the risk of medical errors.  In addition, patients who see a burned-out doctor are less satisfied with their care and may be more likely to sue if something goes wrong.  Interestingly, burned-out doctors seem to be more prone to car accidents.

What can you do about it if you are a doctor or nurse and you think you might be burned out?  First of all, be honest with yourself about the situation.  Talk with your supervisor and find out what resources are available at work.  Think about whether you’re taking steps to take care of yourself and enjoy your life NOW.  Too many of us focus on the future at the expense of the present!

After this process, it’s time to reconnect with the joy of your career.  Why did you choose a career in medicine in the first place?  What are the biggest stressors?  Are there ways to reduce the stress while maximizing the rewarding parts of your career?

Physician burnout (and nursing burnout) is a big problem in medicine and more and more organizations are recognizing it.  While your organization may offer tools to decrease burnout, it’s first up to you to recognize that you are losing your joy.

After all, the first step to fixing a problem is recognizing it exists in the first place.


How To Be YOUR Healthiest You!

Have you ever had a salesperson try to sell you something you didn’t want?  Maybe you were shopping for a new TV and the salesperson tried to get you to buy something bigger or more expensive than what you were looking for?  Or you’re looking for a new lipstick and the salesperson tries to convince you that their entire line of cosmetics is Just perfect for you!

Even worse, have you been talked into buying something and got home and found it wasn’t what you thought?

When someone tries to sell you something without knowing what would make your life better, they are wasting their time and yours.

Since I can’t possibly know each and every one of you, I try to write about a variety of health topics and let you pick and choose what is helpful for you.  (And I hope you know that I LOVE suggestions for post topics.  If you want to read about something, please drop me an email and let me know!)

There is, however, a tool to help me to know exactly what would help YOU.  What would make YOUR life better.  How I can help you meet YOUR health goals.  What would help you be YOUR healthiest you!

That tool is Shaklee’s HealthPrint personalized health assessment. This assessment is a five-minute questionnaire that asks about diet and lifestyle and your individual health goals.  It then gives you suggestions to improve your diet and lifestyle, as well as adding nutritional supplementation, so that you can meet your health goals!

I realize I’ve written about the HealthPrint before, a little over a year ago, and some of you took advantage of the assessment then.  Many of you didn’t, or you subscribed to my blog since that time.

Why am I writing about it again? Because it is still true that in order to know how to help YOU, I have to know where you’re coming from.  I have to know what’s important to you.  In order to help you be your healthiest you, I have to know what your personal challenges and goals are.  And this is such a quick and easy way to learn about you!

This week I want to invite you to take Shaklee’s HealthPrint and let me learn a little about you.  In return, I can help YOU learn a little about you too!  Maybe you already know you don’t get enough sleep.  Maybe you DIDN’T know that you aren’t getting quite enough exercise.  Maybe you didn’t realize drinking that soda in the afternoon isn’t a good choice.

Yes, the HealthPrint makes suggestions for adding supplements.  If you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time, you’re aware that I’m a firm believer in nutritional supplementation.  Surveys show 95% of Americans don’t get all the nutrition they need from their diet.  I don’t think I eat healthier than 95% of Americans, do you think YOU do?  And going without essential nutrients just isn’t acceptable.

Nutrition therapy put my migraines in remission 8 years ago.  It helped my mother heal what SHOULD have been permanent neuropathy in her hands and feet from chemotherapy for breast cancer.  It helped my husband avoid serious adverse effects from HIS chemotherapy for multiple myeloma.  My boys are tall and healthy and strong with the highest quality nutritional support available on the market.

And it’s hard to argue with scientific proof that those who use Shaklee supplements are healthier than those who don’t use them.  Don’t believe me?  Click this link to see the research.  Want more?  Okey dokey, here’s more 🙂

Whether your health goals include weight loss, better physical fitness, stress relief, better sleep, healthy aging, or just good overall health, I can help.  Shaklee can help.  The first step is the 5-minute, 20-question HealthPrint questionnaire.

Don’t you have 5 minutes to spend, to learn how to be YOUR healthiest you?

Click this link and take the HealthPrint assessment now!

PS – Even if you took the HealthPrint last year, you can still take it again.  Maybe things have changed!  Maybe you’re eating better, or your goals are different 🙂


Should Doctors Fire Patients?

“Just tell her to send in the f*@&ing prescription!”

Really?  This is how you talk to people?  Unfortunately, sometimes this is EXACTLY how patients talk to my staff.  The question is, how should a doctor handle a patient like this?

What if this is YOU speaking to my staff this way?  Should I fire you? Should doctors fire patients?

That is an important topic of discussion among medical personnel especially in the outpatient setting.  Clearly, a patient who uses abusive language towards staff members should get the “You have 90 days to find a new doctor” letter.  But are there other reasons why patients should be dismissed from the practice?

Your relationship with your doctor is really not like your relationship with anyone else.  It’s a unique mix of cheerleader, parent, coach and cop.  There has to be mutual respect and trust.

Patients often talk about the trust they have in their doctor.  I agree, that trust is critical.  You have to be able to trust that I know my stuff, that I’ll be able to listen to your symptoms, ask the right questions, recognize the physical findings on exam, order the right tests, then put it all together to come to the right diagnosis.

What patients often don’t understand is that I have to be able to trust YOU.  For example, I have to know you’ll answer me truthfully when I ask you questions.

For instance, how much alcohol do you drink?  Do you use drugs?  Are you taking your medicine every day?  How many sex partners have you had in your life?  This year?  This week?  Did you really lose that prescription or did you sell it?  Are you seeing three other doctors who are prescribing the same medication I am?

The relationship we have is absolutely necessary for us to be able to work together as a team.  I’m not painting the walls in your living room, I’m guiding you to your healthiest and best self possible.  Are you listening to me and giving me honest feedback?  Are you helping me craft a good treatment plan that makes sense to us both?

If I were to poll friends of mine in the medical field I would guess these are the most common reasons we have to dismiss patients from our practices:

  • Repeated no-call/no-shows (lack of respect for the office and other patients)
  • Abusive language and behavior towards the doctor and/or staff
  • Failure to pay their bill (an unfortunate reality of business)

However, I would submit there are other valid reasons to dismiss a patient from the practice:

  • Dishonest behavior such as lying
  • Consistent failure to keep up their part of the treatment plan, such as a diabetic who neglects taking their medication, going to the dietitian or checking blood sugars
  • Failure to maintain appropriate boundaries

By the way, I’m dead serious about that last one.  I had a patient once who wanted to see me socially.  That is, he wanted to date me.  Never mind the fact that both of us were married (me very happily, him not so much).  Never mind that such a thing would violate my oath, State Medical Board regulations, and all the profession’s ethical standards.  He was very persistent.  His find-a-new-doctor letter got mailed out the next day!  What a nightmare…

My patients are awesome.  I absolutely love my practice and the vast majority of my patients are a pleasure to see.  However, I’m not shy about dismissing patients.  If they make me and my staff miserable, or if I’m not effective in motivating them to get their health conditions under control to the best of their ability, then it is in everyone’s best interest that they choose a new doctor.

QUESTION:  Do you work with the public in your job?  Do you have the ability to “fire” clients?  Would you add any reasons to fire patients to the ones I listed above?


Alkaline Vs. Alkalinizing Foods

Lately I have been seeing a lot of ads for “alkaline” foods and beverages.  Companies are marketing everything from “alkaline water” to specially packaged convenience foods to improve the pH of your body.  Companies promote these foods to decrease your risk of cancer and heart disease, arthritis and kidney stones.

Do they work?

In a word, no.  The pH of a food itself has little to no impact on the pH of your body.  The stomach is extremely acidic and easily overwhelms the intrinsic pH of the food itself.  So “alkaline water” is water that has had its pH adjusted above 7 through artificial means.

However, there is evidence that a diet rich in ALKALINIZING foods is quite healthy for you.  This change in acid is accomplished because of how the foods are processed in the body, NOT based on the pH of the food itself.

There was a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that reported the amount of acid produced by the digestion of certain foods can be estimated almost entirely based on two nutrients.

Protein, especially animal protein, produces acid when it is processed in the body, which must be buffered by the cells and eliminated in the kidneys.  Buffering the acid tends to leach minerals from the bones. This can promote osteoporosis and the formation of kidney stones in the acidic urine.

Potassium salts tend to neutralize acid and decrease the amount of acid excreted in the urine.  In fact, potassium citrate is a medication prescribed for patients with certain types of kidney stones. It also has been shown to protect bone density in patients at risk for osteoporosis.

If you want to properly balance the acidity and alkalinity in your body, which may be a marker of health and risk for disease, you should do three things.

  • Limit or eliminate animal protein (meat, dairy and eggs) from your diet. Your body creates a lot of acid when processing this type of protein.  Replace animal protein with healthy plant proteins like soy, quinoa and beans.
  • Get plenty of potassium in your diet.  You can estimate the amount of potassium in your diet using a calorie tracker like MyFitnessPal.  Examples of high potassium foods are oranges, bananas, potatoes with the skins, broccoli and spinach.  You can see more options here.
  • Eat fresh whole plant foods at every meal.  Include plenty of fruit, fresh veggies, whole unprocessed grains, beans, nuts and seeds.

Don’t bother with “alkaline” foods or beverages like high-pH water.  There is little evidence they impact acid production in the body, or any other marker of health, at all.

QUESTION: Have you seen marketing for “alkaline” foods and beverages?