Back To School Health Concerns

It’s that time of year again!  Have you got kids going to school this fall?  Me too!  We’re shopping for school supplies and clothes and shoes just like everybody else.

Are your kids ready to go back?  There are a number of things you can do to set your kids up for success this school year!

Good Sleep

Did your kids get off their school sleep schedule this summer?  Don’t worry, if they did you should have plenty of time to get them back on-track before school starts.

Elementary school children need about 10 hours of sleep per night.  For instance, our kids’ bus came at 7:30 AM last year.  Since they got up between 6:30 and 7:00, that made our bedtime about 8:30 so that they were asleep by 9.

You will want to give plenty of time to adjust a child’s sleep schedule.  Move bedtime by no more than a half-hour per night, every few nights, to let your child adjust.  If they’ve become accustomed to sleeping in, start instituting a set wake-up time.  In the adjustment period if they seem tired let them take a short nap.

There are plenty of things to adjust to in the first few weeks of school.  Fatigue and sleepiness and battles over going to bed and waking up are things you just don’t need to deal with.

Doctor’s Visits

Are your kids playing sports this school year?  Summertime is a good time to get their sports physicals out of the way.  Don’t worry, the physical is good for a year and is covered by health insurance.  Make sure to bring along any medication administration forms (for asthma or other meds your child will need to take at school).

If your child will be heading into kindergarten or 7th grade, they will need vaccines prior to starting school.  You should have gotten paperwork from the school already if your child is affected.  Remember that although your rising 7th grader is required to have the DTaP, the meningitis and HPV vaccines are also recommended at this age.

I get a lot of questions about the HPV vaccine and dove a little deeper into that topic in this post.  Please discuss the vaccine recommendations with your child’s doctor in detail.

After the 7th grade shots, your child will be done with tetanus shots until after college (unless she hurts herself, gets bit by a dog, etc) but she will need a meningitis shot booster at age 16.  Other than annual flu shots those are all the shots your child will need.

Nutrition

My younger son participates in a summer day program every year that does not provide lunch.  We were a little concerned at the beginning that packing lunches would be a big hassle.  To our pleased surprise, it has been a very positive experience.

Our lunch planning guidelines have been that our child needs a sandwich (with deli meat and cheese) and a fruit, a vegetable, and a starch for his lunch.  We read labels and used a food scale to explore portions for the starch (often pretzels, corn chips or a granola bar).  Here’s a website with interesting school lunch ideas.

Now after several summers he makes his own lunches like a pro.  Even better, when we go to the market and our kids want to try a different food (like barbecue potato chips) we can look at ingredients and talk about what’s in there, portion sizes and how they’re manipulated, price versus value, and other good topics.  We’ve even gotten them to try some new vegetables!

From a health standpoint, heading back to school can be stressful from a health standpoint.  With a little planning your youngsters can transition into the school year happy and healthy.

QUESTION:  What back to school health concerns do you have that I didn’t discuss?  I can always talk about them next week, LOL!

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