“Adrenal Support” Supplements Contain Hormones

Yet again we have evidence that supplement companies are either not testing their products or are deliberately adding pharmaceuticals to their supplements.

In a report released in March, researchers at the Mayo Clinic purchased bottles of the twelve most popular “adrenal support” supplements at a “popular online shopping website.”  The publication does NOT specify which website or which supplements were tested, more’s the pity.

The researchers analyzed the products and found that ALL of the products contained thyroid hormone.  UNDISCLOSED thyroid hormone.  This means that if someone who took these products was also taking thyroid medication for hypothyroidism, the supplement may very well disrupt their treatment and make adjusting their medication dose very difficult.  For instance, one of the supplements contained 1.2 mcg of liothyronine per recommended daily dose.  Those who take liothyronine (brand name Cytomel) will know that the smallest dose tablet is 5 mcg which means this particular supplement DEFINITELY would have affects on someone’s thyroid function.

Other hormones found in these “adrenal support” supplements include pregnenolone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (female hormones), androstenedione (male hormone), budesonide, cortisone and cortisol (adrenal hormones).  These hormones are present in biologically meaningful amounts.  They are NOT just contaminants and unimportant.  These hormones will change the way the body functions.

I know WHY they are in these supplements.  A number of these supplements have declared animal gland extracts documented on the labels.  (I wrote in a previous post about why this is problematic.)  However, a number of these are considered “herbal” adrenal support supplements with NO gland extracts.  There is NO way these hormones got into “herbal” supplements by accident.

Why would a supplement company “dope” their adrenal support supplements with hormones?  Easy.  They can improve fatigue symptoms, which is what these supplements are marketed for.  However, the hormonal environment in the body is very finely balanced, and supplements with undisclosed and unregulated hormone ingredients are NOT the way to go about treating fatigue!

If you have fatigue symptoms PLEASE see your doctor, nurse practitioner or naturopath and have testing done BEFORE starting any supplement that promises to fix your “adrenal fatigue.”  Especially beware of and avoid any product that has the words “bovine,” “porcine” or “ovine” anywhere on the label, because those indicate ingredients that come from cow, pig or sheep body parts.  (Ewww…)

If you choose to use supplements (and I definitely recommend that you do, because only 5% of Americans get all the nutrition they need from their diet on a daily basis), be sure to choose a company with a long track record of safety, quality testing, and a commitment to advancing the understanding of human nutrition for the benefit of all humanity.  This is why I partner with the Shaklee Corporation!

Want to see if you would benefit from Shaklee supplements (and get personalized recommendations for diet and lifestyle changes to get and stay healthier)?  Click this link to get your HealthPrint today!

QUESTION: Do you have fatigue?  Have you tried supplements to improve your symptoms?  What was your experience?

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Spring Exercise Tips

 

spring-into-fitnessHooray!  It’s finally spring!

How many of you out there love to work out outdoors?  I do!  I’m a runner and I’m really excited about getting back outdoors for a jog 🙂

So is there anything special about the springtime exercise transition that you should keep in mind?  Here are 3 spring exercise tips to be aware of.

1.  Dress warmly

It’s really NOT that warm out there yet.  Today’s temperature is in the sixties and I’m comfortable in jeans and a hoodie.  Of course I’m not running, but people tend to overestimate the temperature and UNDERESTIMATE how much clothing they need in the spring.

Layering is key.  You should dress so that you’re comfortable when you start AND so you can take off a layer or two as you warm up.  Also consider it tends to be windy in the spring.  Wind wicks body heat away quickly and can cause you to get cold especially when you’re sweaty.  Respect your body and dress properly!

2.  Train up slow

When you’re transitioning from indoor sport/training to outdoors, remember it’s not a simple switch.  Running on a treadmill or riding a stationary bike is different from road racing.  Hills, wind, traffic, uneven terrain and other factors make outdoor workouts different.

Make sure to decrease your intensity/mileage when you transition to exercising outdoors.  Take it slow!  If you’re training for a road race make sure to give yourself plenty of time for a leisurely and thorough transition.  Fast changes lead to injuries!

3.  Try something new

A new season is a perfect time to try a new sport or fitness activity.  Spend a little time thinking about what the best activities are for the current season.  Jogging and cycling are perfect warm-weather outdoor sports, but there are others too.

Hiking and climbing are popular in northern Ohio especially in the Metroparks.  Horseback riding is perfect for warmer weather (if you have a friend who owns horses or can take classes).  Rowing and sailing will be starting up soon.

Spring is a beautiful time of year, especially in a place that spends so much of the year buried under snow and ice!  Get out there and take advantage of it by taking the show on the road!

QUESTION:  What is your favorite form of exercise in warmer weather?  Are you interested in trying something new this year?

 

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Is It Love? Or Is It Limerence?

As the mother of a teenager, I think I speak for most parents when I say I worry about my child completely losing his head over a girl.  Whether your teen is male or female really isn’t relevant to this intensely visceral worry that keeps parents up at night.

Part of what steals parents’ peace of mind when their teen starts dating is that most of us have been there.  We’ve said and done things that make us cringe in thinking back, while praying desperately that our children will have more sense than we did.

A friend recently pointed me in the direction of an entirely new (to me) concept called limerence.  In reading about it, I immediately recognized elements of my teenaged patients’ first experiences with dating and, if I’m completely honest, with my own first dating experiences back when the dinosaurs roamed the Earth 😉

What is limerence?  The dictionary defines this word as “the state of being infatuated or obsessed with another person.”  Sounds like a crush, right?  There’s actually a bit more to it than that.

The concept of limerence was first explored by psychologist Dorothy Tennov in her book “Love And Limerence: The Experience Of Being In Love,” which was published in 1979.  She believed limerence was a disordered form of romantic love, closer to obsession.

Tennov’s limerence was characterized by

  • Idealization of the person – to the point that negative characteristics are minimized or not recognized at all.
  • Uncontrollable and intrusive thoughts about the person
  • Extreme shyness and awkwardness, nervousness and confusion around the person
  • Euphoria in response to real or imagined signs the person returns your feelings
  • Fantasizing about or searching for signs of reciprocation
  • Arranging one’s schedule to maximize encounters with the person
  • Being reminded of the person by everything around you
  • Fear of rejection and despair or thoughts of suicide if rejection occurs

Sounds very much like a teenage crush, right?  There’s actually something to that.  There is evidence that limerence, or infatuation if you like that word better, activates the same parts of the brain that addicts activate by using their drug of choice.  The intense euphoria and deep despair, the amount of time spent thinking about the person and the inability to think of anything else strikes a chord with those of us who treat addicts.  Substitute “heroin” for “Judy” and you would instantly recognize your lovesick teenage boy as an addict.

Limerence is much more likely to be seen in teenagers.  First of all, their brains aren’t done developing yet and they are much more susceptible to addictions of all sorts.  Smoking, alcohol, opiates and dating all light up the brain in similar ways, ways in which teenagers’ brains seem to be primed to behave.

If you’ve ever tried to tell a teenager they aren’t REALLY in love and the world won’t REALLY end if Judy doesn’t love him back, you know you might as well tell those things to the family dog for all the good it will do you.

It’s painful enough when one teen has a bad crush and the object of his crush doesn’t want anything to do with him.  What do you do when two teens experience the intensity of limerence for each other at the same time?

These times are when we earn our parenting badges.  Just like addicts, teens (and adults) in limerence are sneaky.  They lie to those who love them and take advantage of them.  Adults in limerence have extramarital affairs.  They do things that, were they in their right minds, they would never do.  Personalities change.  Formerly sensible people have sex in spite of knowing the risks and get pregnant and/or contract sexually transmitted diseases.  Good students ditch school or let their studies suffer.  Money that should be saved for college tuition or car insurance is spent impulsively on gifts and activities to impress the beloved person.

How do we keep our teens safe?  If your teen is dating and you notice a big change in behavior or personality, that should cause you to be very concerned.  Make sure you are talking to your teen about their activities and keep them appropriately chaperoned.

Remember my analogy about the lap bar on the roller coaster.  Everybody pushes the lap bar when they get into the seat on the roller coaster.  We are relieved when the restraint holds firm, NOT when it gives with a little pressure.  Our teens are the same way.  WE are their lap bar in the roller coaster of dating.  Expect them to push against us.  They will chafe against our restraint, but letting go, letting them get themselves in too deep, is not what they need from us.

Limerence, research has shown, does not last.  It generally does not deepen into an adult form of love that leads to happy marriages and families.  It is intense and overwhelming but does not stand the test of time and adversity.  Our teens need us to help them avoid making choices that will alter their life forever.

QUESTION:  Is this the first time you’ve heard of limerence?  Do you recognize the concept (if not the word) from your own adolescence or the experiences of friends and family?

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Waist Circumference Predicts Heart Risk

When you step on the scale, do you see a normal weight?  When you check that BMI chart by the scale at the doctor’s office, are you reassured to see your score is under 25?  That means you’re good, right?

Not so fast.  There’s another measurement to take.  Your waist circumference also says a lot about your heart risk.

Carrying body fat around your middle, called abdominal adiposity, is a marker of higher heart risk.  For women, a waist circumference over 35 inches is a risk factor for heart disease.  (That’s assuming she’s not pregnant, of course!)  For men, the threshold is a waist circumference over 40 inches.

A study published recently in the European Heart Journal shared some interesting insights.  The authors analyzed data from almost 300,000 people to see what waist circumference and other measures of “fatness” tell us about heart risk.

They found that there was a linear increase in heart risk with increasing waist circumference.  Also, body fat percentage, waist-to-hip ratio and waist-to-height ratio also gave almost a linear increase in heart risk with increasing values.

BMI did NOT give a good correlation to heart risk.  I’ve always hated the BMI.  It’s stupid and doesn’t account for body composition.  Someone with a lot of muscle, like LeBron James, is NOT obese but you can’t tell that from the BMI.

So when you go to the doctor and he or she measures your weight and height, don’t stop there.  Ask to have them measure your waist circumference too.  Better yet, see if they have a body fat analyzer.  I have a handheld unit in my office that isn’t perfect, but it does give a much better estimate of whether someone is overweight or obese than BMI does.

When I am working on weight loss with patients, I target 30% body fat in women and 25% in men.  That’s just a starting point, people may need a different individualized target.

A third of Americans die of cardiovascular disease, and two thirds of Americans are obese or overweight.  Waist circumference can help determine whether you are at higher risk for a cardiovascular event.

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