Menopause Symptoms And Quality of Life

Women who have reached menopause often feel as though they’ve traded one problem for another.  Sure, you don’t have to deal with the hassle of menstrual periods and worry about pregnancy anymore.  The hot flushes, night sweats, sleep problems, mood swings and vaginal dryness are not much improvement though.

Ask women who have menopause symptoms what their least favorite part is.  They will say the hot flushes and sweats at random times of the day and night.  They will tell you about the poor sleep and emotional roller-coaster.  They often WON’T tell you they have vaginal dryness and intolerable itching and loss of urinary control.  They usually won’t tell you they can’t tolerate intercourse with their partner anymore.

A lot of times they don’t tell ME that either.  I ask every woman at her physical about these symptoms if she is heading into menopause.  Women are embarrassed to discuss those parts of their bodies, even with their doctor.

There was a research study published recently in Menopause that asked women with menopause symptoms specifically about vaginal, vulvar and urinary symptoms.  Women who had had no menstrual period for at least a year were asked to fill out a questionnaire, and then had a gynecological exam.

Over 90% of the women were found to have vulvovaginal atrophy.  After the ovaries stop making estrogen at menopause, the skin and other tissues around the vagina and urethra become thinner, dryer and more fragile.  This is called atrophy and is often responsible for the itching, irritation and pain with sex that many women experience.

Many women know about hormone replacement therapy for menopausal symptoms and often refuse to take it.  Not as many women know that there are safer alternatives for vulvovaginal atrophy.  I usually recommend women try over-the-counter DHEA cream which they can get at the health food store or online.  One of my patients told me she tried Julva cream which she bought online and it helped a lot.  (Not an affiliate and I have no personal experience with it, just passing along a report from a happy patient.)

Topical estrogen cream is also very effective and is safe to use even in women who have had estrogen-sensitive breast cancer.  This is a prescription and usually requires an exam to make sure the diagnosis is right.  Many things other than vulvovaginal atrophy cause itching in pain (including infections and some skin conditions).

If you or a woman you love is suffering with itching, pain and/or urinary symptoms after menopause please don’t suffer in silence.  See the doctor and discuss your symptoms so you can get treatment.  Treatment works!

QUESTION:  Have you had problems with menopausal vaginal symptoms?  How has it affected your life?

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DON’T Exercise For Weight Loss!

Everybody promotes the benefits of exercise for weight loss.  And yes, becoming more active is one of the best ways to increase your day’s calorie expenditure if your goal is weight loss.  However, is weight loss a good motivator for getting someone moving?

Turns out, it’s not.  In fact, it’s one of the WORST motivators.  People who said their reason for getting active was to lose weight were LEAST likely to exercise consistently.

What motivates someone to lose weight?  The most common reason is to obtain someone ELSE’s approval.  You might want to look better in a swimsuit or put a spark back in your marriage, or bring your cholesterol test results or blood sugars under better control.  The sad truth is that weight loss is usually motivated by outside factors rather than by a true and pure desire to slim down.

So if weight loss isn’t a good motivator for exercise, what is?  Here are some suggestions:

1.  Pure enjoyment.  I take care of quite a few runners.  I am a runner myself.  I don’t run to lose or maintain weight (although it is a nice side benefit) but just because I love running.  Runners will run until their toenails fall off altogether.  (Unfortunately I have a case of plantar fasciitis right now that is keeping me from running.)

Those who love tennis will play through excruciating elbow pain.  Those who love martial arts or boxing will suffer all kinds of trauma.  Family doctors are well accustomed to having to put the kibosh on our crazy sports-injured patients’ plans to do further harm to themselves in their love of their sport.  We just do it because we love it!

2.  “Me” time.  So maybe there isn’t an exercise that you love like the fitness fanatics in #1 above.  There are ways to make your exercise a getaway as well.  For instance, I have taken to watching movies and TV shows on Netflix while I’m on the treadmill.  With my busy life, this is the ONLY time I get to watch any TV or movies.  So on those crazy days when you’re just too tired to climb on the stationary bike or treadmill, you can bribe yourself also with a good movie or TV show.

3. “Us” time.  If you have a workout buddy it’s hard to back out of a workout date.  Call a good friend and ask him or her if they would like to set up a regular time for a brisk walk or a fitness class.  Tell your buddy you could use a spotter for some extra-heavy sets.  Try a new form of exercise with your spouse.  My husband and I have practiced martial arts for years and now our boys do too.  Making it a family affair keeps us engaged and showing up even on days when ONE of us really doesn’t feel like going.

4. Health benefits.  Your body works better when you’re active.  Your digestion moves along better and you’ll have less problem with constipation.  Natural endorphins are released which relieve stress, anxiety and depression.  Sleep quality improves with exercise.  Lung function improves which means you’ll huff and puff less when chasing the kids and grandkids.

There are so many good reasons to get active and fit, you’re not limited to the promise of weight loss!  What will get you to the gym or motivate you to lace up your sneakers after a long day at work, when all you want to do is park yourself on the couch in front of the TV?  Be creative and find something you truly love!  If all else fails, create an irresistible incentive that will get you moving.

Guess what!  You’ll probably lose weight too 🙂

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What Is Acute Flaccid Myelitis?

It’s a parent’s nightmare.  Your perfectly healthy child comes down with a bad cold.  While they’re miserable for a few days they get better as expected.  Then shortly after the cough and snot are gone, your child gets sick again.  Suddenly your child loses the ability to walk because their legs become very weak.

Since 2014 there has been a new, rare and severe neurological condition reported mostly in children called acute flaccid myelitis (AFM).  This illness can result in permanent paralysis and the cause is not known.

Acute flaccid myelitis behaves almost exactly like polio but it is NOT caused by the poliovirus.  Doctors have checked and none of the patients have had poliovirus in their bodies.  However, almost all of the patients have had a fever or mild respiratory illness before the weakness started.  Most of the cases occur in the late summer and early fall, when the class of viruses that includes polio, enteroviruses, are most common.

AFM causes the sudden onset of weakness in one or more limbs.  Usually one side of the body is more seriously affected than the other.  There is usually no numbness or loss of sensation in the limb(s) although there may be associated pain.

Patients may also have trouble swallowing, weakness or drooping on one side of the face, double vision, problems speaking, and in severe cases trouble breathing.  If you or your child develops these sort of symptoms it is important to get care right away because treatment can be lifesaving.  Even though the cause isn’t known, prompt diagnosis and treatment are critical.

Other illnesses can behave like acute flaccid myelitis.  A stroke, West Nile Virus, Guillain-Barre syndrome and some other infections are on the list.

It’s estimated that one to two in a million children in the US will get AFM per year.  That’s REALLY rare, but very serious.  Parents need to know that if their child seems lethargic or has any weakness at all, they should seek care immediately.

QUESTION: Have you heard of acute flaccid myelitis?

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Eating Out With Food Allergies

As someone who has multiple food allergies/intolerances, I know from personal experience that restaurants can be tricky.  When you have to avoid a number of common ingredients, eating out makes one anxious

Parents of children with food allergies are understandably more comfortable eating their meals at home.  When they control the ingredients they can be sure their kids are safe.  However, there are a number of strategies that can make eating out safer for both children and adults with food allergies.

There was a poster presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology annual meeting this week in Washington State.  Researchers at University Hospitals Rainbow Babies’ and Children’s Hospital explored strategies used to avoid allergic reactions in restaurants.

They found that those who had never had a reaction used more safety strategies than those who had had reactions.  Once a person had an allergic reaction, they tended to increase their use of safety strategies.  This makes sense, right?  Anyone who has had an allergic reaction is pretty motivated to avoid another one!

The allergens people reported included the most common ones like peanuts, tree nuts, dairy, wheat, eggs and soy.  85% of the participants were children, they were split evenly male-female, and most were white.

Safety strategies varied widely.  The most common strategies included

  • Talking to wait staff, manager and chef about allergies
  • Checking menus and ingredients on the restaurant website, if possible
  • Choosing restaurants that are allergy-friendly or have a low chance of contamination
  • Ordering meals with simple ingredients
  • Double checking with wait staff after food arrives

The researchers found that the more different strategies were used, the less likely reactions were.  They also advised that whenever eating out, those who have food allergies should always bring an EpiPen or similar treatment with them in case of a reaction.

I know from my own experience that eating out with food allergies can be tough.  However, if you or your family member has food allergies, you don’t have to give up restaurant foods.  Simple strategies can make eating at restaurants safer and more enjoyable!

QUESTION:  Do you or a family member have a food allergy?  What strategies do you use to make eating out safer?

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Just What Are Supplements FOR?

My new student and I were talking in the office the other day.  She was surprised (and all my students are, actually) at how often I talk to patients about nutrition.  Usually without my patients really WANTING to hear my opinions about nutrition, LOL!

So we got to talking about the question, “What are supplements for?”  This is something I don’t think I’ve ever put in so many words before.

We know our diets stink.  People eat too much meat, too much junk food, too much sugar.  We don’t get enough whole fresh foods.  Even if we did get all our servings of fruits and veggies (and I try really hard) our foods aren’t as nutritious as they were in the past.

This decrease in the nutrition content of food is generally because of changes in farming practices and because we tend to get our food from far away.  We get peaches from Chile instead of from Georgia.  We get apples from Washington State instead of from local orchards.  And we want to eat apples in June when they haven’t been harvested in over 6 months.

So one of the main reasons I advocate supplementation is to make up for gaps in our diet.  A good quality, comprehensive multivitamin (and yes, Shaklee’s Vita Lea is the best on the market, the one I use and recommend) goes a long way to filling in for days when our diets aren’t the best, or when the food we eat has lost nutrition due to storage and processing.

Other than a multivitamin, what other supplements do we take to make up gaps in our diet?  People under stress tend to use up the B vitamins more quickly.  People who suffer with migraines tend to have gene mutations which make them need more B vitamins.  More than half of us don’t get enough magnesium in the diet.  We eat way too much omega 6 oil, so omega 3 fats from fish oil supplements can help correct that.  And of course nearly everyone needs a vitamin D supplement especially in winter.

These supplements as mentioned above are used from a Functional Medicine approach.  This means we give the body what it needs to function properly, and avoid poisoning it!  Supplements used in this way are generally very safe, and very few side effects.

Giving the body what it needs doesn’t just refer to food.  This includes fresh clean water, plenty of rest and quality sleep.  Practicing our faith and getting fresh air and sunshine, exercise, and time with those we love are “nutrients” as well.  The word “nutrient” comes from the same root as “nurture.”  When we nourish ourselves properly we will be healthier!

And poisons or toxins include pesticides, alcohol and excess sugar but can also include excess stress.  Negative self-talk is toxic.  Smoking, recreational drugs and artificial food ingredients are other examples of things we should avoid in order for our bodies, minds and spirits to be as healthy as possible.

How else can supplements be used?  Supplements can also be used as drugs.  Some examples are St. John’s wort for depression, milk thistle for liver disorders, and red yeast rice for high cholesterol.  These supplements are considered botanical drugs.  They have risks just like pharmaceutical drugs do.  The risks tend to be lower, but the effectiveness is lower as well.  Some supplements can be used either way.  For instance, magnesium in high doses is a very effective laxative and is used for bowel prep before colonoscopy.

How can you tell the difference between a supplement used for a functional medicine purpose and one used as a drug?  It’s pretty simple actually.  Is the nutrient or supplement found in food, and can one be deficient in it?  One can be deficient in magnesium, but there’s no such thing as a milk thistle or St. John’s wort deficiency.

I’d like to use a very current controversy to illustrate the difference.  Right now there are a lot of supplement companies starting to market krill oil as a “better fish oil.”  Early research suggests that the main omega 3 fatty acids in both krill oil and fish oil are better absorbed from krill oil and may influence cholesterol and glucose metabolism in favorable ways when compared to fish oil.

The problem is that krill isn’t food for humans.  We have little or no idea what a safe dose of krill oil would be, or what the long-term effect may be.  There are no studies showing how krill oil supplements affect heart risk or any other health risk in humans.  Fish oil supplements are generally made from edible fish like sardines, tuna or salmon.

So fish oil is a functional medicine supplement, made from a human food that most of us don’t get enough of to balance out the oodles of omega-6 fatty acids in our diets.  Krill oil is not a human food, containing a form of omega-3 fatty acids not clearly understood.  I would therefore classify krill oil as a drug, one that’s not well understood.  Certainly not well enough to recommend regular use.

Before someone recommends a supplement to you, think to yourself whether that supplement is meant to fill a gap in your diet and provide nutrients your body needs to function well.  If not, it is a drug.  Make sure you understand the risks and benefits, because there are always risks with drugs, whether they come from nature or from a factory.  Often the ones that come from the factory are safer because they’re better understood and better studied.

QUESTION: Have you ever thought before about the question “What are supplements for?”  What do you think now?

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Weight Loss Reduces Breast Cancer Risk

Are you tired of me talking about weight loss yet?  LOL!  I just came across yet another reason for women to lose and maintain their weight after menopause.  Weight loss reduces breast cancer risk!

There was an study recently published in Cancer that looked at breast cancer risk in women who gained weight, maintained their weight and lost weight after menopause.  The authors found that weight loss of at least 5% body weight after menopause did significantly decrease the risk of breast cancer over the 11 year follow up period.

In this study, women lost an average of 19 pounds.  While not a small amount of weight, it isn’t a crazy amount either.  They were able to maintain their weight loss for the most part too.

We know that breast cancer risk is higher in women who are overweight and obese.  Since over 1/3 of women in the United States are obese, this is a significant risk factor for breast cancer in this country.  According to NHANES survey data from 2013-2014, 40.4% of women in the US are obese.

Let’s do some math.  Approximately how many American women are obese?  In 2010 (according to census data) there were just under 157 million female Americans.  53.2 million were over 50, and 40.4% are obese.  That’s 21.5 million obese female Americans over age 50.  (Since we’re talking about breast cancer I want to focus on the population most at risk, and the study focused on women after menopause.)

In the study just published in Cancer, they found that 5.09% of women who maintained their weight got breast cancer, and 4.27% of the women who lost at least 5% of their body weight got breast cancer.  That’s an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 0.82%.  This translates to a Number Needed to Treat (NNT) of 122.  (Remember that NNT = 1 / ARR)  This also assumes that the breast cancer risk reduction was caused by the weight loss.

If 122 obese women have to lose at least 5% of their body weight (and maintain that loss) to prevent one case of breast cancer…

That is over 176,000 women that could be spared breast cancer over approximately a 10-year time frame.  With about 266,000 women diagnosed every year with breast cancer, that’s a 7% reduction.

Will you be one of the women who suffers a potentially preventable case of breast cancer?  Now that you know weight loss reduces breast cancer risk, will you make sure to lose weight and get closer to your ideal body weight?  Your heart, your liver, your brain, your pancreas, your joints, your back, and even your breasts will thank you!

QUESTION: Do the numbers in this article surprise you?

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Surgery Type Matters In Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer screening is a routine part of women’s health care.  I do Pap tests and HPV screens every week to check for this problem.  Luckily I rarely make a cancer diagnosis (although abnormal Pap tests are fairly common).

Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide, with over half a million cases diagnosed per year.  About 13,000 new cases are expected to be diagnosed in the US in 2018.  Approximately 4000 American women will die of cervical cancer this year, according to the American Cancer Society.  Women are most commonly diagnosed in their 30s and 40s, but it can happen in women over age 65 as well.

It’s important to realize that this disease is more common in black and Hispanic women, but much less likely to occur in women who get regular screening.  Cervical cancer is preventable with vaccination, regular screening and treatment of abnormal cells found on Pap tests.

Once a diagnosis of cervical cancer is made, surgery is the most effective treatment.  Hysterectomy and removal of lymph nodes in the pelvis is necessary.  What hasn’t been understood until recently is whether the TYPE of hysterectomy mattered.

In this country, most surgery that CAN be done in a minimally invasive way IS done in that fashion.  Laparoscopic and robot-assisted surgeries are associated with less pain, shorter recovery, less blood loss and less risk of infection.  However, recently it has been found that these minimally invasive surgical techniques are actually associated with a HIGHER death rate from cervical cancer.

Two articles (1, 2) published in the New England Journal of Medicine this week showed that open abdominal hysterectomy was much better as far as survival goes than laparoscopic or robot-assisted hysterectomy for cervical cancer.  The number needed to harm in one study was 19 which is really low.  This means for every 19 patients who were treated with a minimally invasive rather than open procedure, one went on to die of cervical cancer who would have survived with the open procedure. In the other study the number needed to harm was 26.

I have two take-home points from this frankly shocking finding.  First, if you know anyone with cervical cancer make sure they know a “keyhole surgery” approach is not as safe as an open procedure.  We can’t assume that an operation that’s right for one condition (like gallbladder removal and appendectomy) is the best for all problems.

The second point is that there needs to be more research done on minimally invasive surgery in cancer patients.  There must be some reason for the difference.  Neither of these studies really addressed WHY there is such a difference between open and minimally invasive operations for cervical cancer.  There are any number of possibilities.  Minimally invasive surgery is as safe for uterine cancer as an open procedure, for instance.

Could it be because cervical cancer is caused by a viral infection?  Or because affected  lymph nodes in cervical cancer are smaller or more subtle or harder to see through the laparoscope?  I really don’t know, and clearly no one else does either.

But with less pain, shorter recovery time, less bleeding and less risk of infection, minimally-invasive surgery is best IF scientists can figure out how to make it safer for cervical cancer patients.  That would be the best result of all.

QUESTION: Do you know anyone who has or had cervical cancer?  What was their experience like?

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Reduce Your Breast Cancer Risk

October is breast cancer awareness month!  My mother, aunt and grandmother all had breast cancer, so reducing MY breast cancer risk is of pretty high interest to me.

Lots of women don’t think about their breast cancer risk except when they get their yearly mammogram.  Early detection makes treatment easier and more successful, so it’s definitely important, but getting your mammogram will not reduce your risk of getting breast cancer.

So what WILL reduce a woman’s breast cancer risk?

Exercise

Even 30 minutes of walking will reduce your risk.  In fact, 30 minutes of brisk walking 4 days per week reduced breast cancer risk by 30-50%.  That’s a huge reduction from just a little effort!

Maintain your weight

Obesity significantly increases a woman’s risk of all cancers including breast cancer.  There is an enzyme called aromatase that is present in fat cells.  It changes male hormones into female hormones.  Even after menopause women’s adrenal glands still make male hormones.  The more fat cells you have, the more aromatase and the more estrogens.

Breast cancer cells are often responsive to estrogens, and so obesity increases the stimulation and growth of these estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cells.  Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight decreases breast cancer risk.

Alcohol

Increasing alcohol intake raises the risk of breast cancer.  Even 3-4 glasses of wine per week has been shown to raise the risk.  The more you drink the higher the risk, but there is no evidence of a “safe” level of alcohol intake.

The most important risk factors for breast cancer are, of course, age and gender.  Women get breast cancer 100 times more often than men, and the risk goes up as we get older.  There are inherited genetic risk factors as well, and there are links to how early menstrual periods started, how many children you’ve had and how late menopause occurred.  Breastfeeding also decreases the risk.  Some of these, like age, are things we can’t control.

But there ARE risks that we can control!  Don’t smoke or drink, exercise regularly and maintain a healthy weight and you will be doing a lot to control your breast cancer risk.

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ER Visit Denials

Imagine you just flew home from a dream trip to Europe and after getting a good night’s sleep in your own bed, you wake up with chest pain and trouble breathing.  Now you’re a young woman so heart attacks really aren’t on the top of your list of worries, but you’re really uncomfortable and a little scared.  A quick call to your doctor’s office and, once informed of your recent airplane flight and the fact that you take birth control pills, you are told to head to the ER.

The ER staff and doctor are very kind and you get an exam, some labs and a scan of your chest which show your pain is from a rib that’s out of place and NOT from a blood clot.  That’s a relief!  Sleeping in funny positions on trains and planes isn’t good for you!

Anti-inflammatories, heat and rest are just the trick to settle the pain and you’re feeling better in just a few days.  However, a different kind of pain starts about 6 weeks later when you get the bill for your ER visit.  Your insurance company has denied the claim, stating that they won’t pay for you going to the ER for a “non-emergent” visit.

Turns out insurance companies like Anthem are trying to control costs by denying claims for ER visits for what they consider non-emergency reasons.  A report published in JAMA recently analyzed what percentage of visits would not be covered and how that relates to the symptoms patients are experiencing.

The researchers found that about 15% of ER visits would be denied with the retrospective review policy.  The problem is that these denied claims had the same symptoms (chest pain, abdominal pain, etc.) as claims that were not denied.  The insurance companies expect patients to distinguish between different types of chest pain and abdominal pain without the benefit of medical training.

This is a mistake.  The researchers in this study noted that patients are going to be hurt by this policy.  If patients with chest pain are afraid their ER visit isn’t going to be covered if it turns out to NOT be a blood clot or heart attack, they will be less likely to get checked out in a timely fashion for problems that could be very serious.

I have a hard enough time getting patients (especially women) to go to ER for chest pain or stroke symptoms.  If insurance companies start denying claims for chest pain that turns out to be bad reflux, or stroke-like symptoms that turn out to be from migraine, people are going to be more likely to ignore their symptoms until it’s too late.

People should NOT go to ER for problems that aren’t emergencies.  Someone who goes to the ER for a sore throat (unless they are directed to go there by their primary care doctor) should have the option of an urgent-care level of care.  Too many non-emergency visits to the ER slows down care for those who have a true emergency.

It’s often hard for us with medical training to be sure someone isn’t having a serious problem.  I send folks to the ER all the time to be evaluated when I can’t reassure them in the office that nothing life-threatening is wrong.  Asking patients without medical training to make those decisions is going to lead to people being hurt.

QUESTION: Have you been to the ER for something that seemed serious but turned out not to be?  What do you think of this new policy?

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The Danger Of Adulterated Supplements

When swimmer Jessica Hardy set two world records in 2008 and was getting ready to compete in the Olympics in Beijing, she had no idea her world was about to come crashing down.  She tested positive for a banned substance right before the Olympics.

Turns out she had taken adulterated supplements that contained the banned substance, undisclosed by the supplement company.  Because she was able to prove the supplement she took contained the substance, her suspension was reduced to one year instead of two.  Still, she missed the Beijing Olympics.

Given the danger of adulteration, why would ANYONE risk taking supplements?  In the United States the supplement industry is only lightly regulated so companies are free to make all sorts of outlandish claims about their products.  My personal feeling is that people are so desperate for a “quick fix” they’re susceptible to too-good-to-be-true product claims for weight loss and other problems.

A report was recently published in JAMA about adulterated supplements.  Turns out almost 800 supplements have been found to have drugs in them, including sildenafil (Viagra), sibutramine (Meridia) and anabolic steroids.  The adulterated supplements are most often marketed for – unsurprisingly – sexual enhancement, weight loss and muscle building.  You can access the database yourself here at the FDA website.

Whether you’re an Olympic swimmer like Jessica Hardy, a world-class wrestler like Narsingh Yadav or Vinod Kumar, or a runner looking to PR your next half marathon, SHOULD you use nutritional supplements?  Which ones should you choose?

If you’ve been following my blog for awhile you probably know my answers to these questions 😉  Good nutrition improves athletic performance, that much is very clear.  And supplements are an efficient way to make sure the body’s nutritional needs (for vitamins, minerals, electrolytes, carbohydrates and protein) are optimally met.

So given this information, taking supplements make sense.  But before choosing a nutritional supplement, you have to ask yourself some questions.  If you have access to a representative for the company (especially if it’s a direct sales company) here are some good questions to get answered.

  • Does the company sponsor Olympic athletes?  How many medals have the sponsored athletes won?  If there are no Olympic athletes, do they sponsor athletes competing in “clean” events – i.e. subject to drug testing?  If not, steer clear.  Many sports supplements have disclaimers in the product literature stating they are not meant for athletes subject to drug testing.  Don’t take those!
  • What research has been done with the company’s products?  Ask to see the publications.  Are they peer reviewed?  You can search in the NIH’s research database to see if it’s a “legit” research article or not.
  • What are the company’s quality procedures?  Is there a money-back guarantee?  How are recalls handled?  Who do you call with a problem?

Ultimately, with supplements the reality in the United States is “let the buyer beware.”  Customers are responsible for doing their own research because the industry isn’t well regulated.  If the product is advertised to produce results that seem too good to be true, they probably are.  Do NOT buy products advertised to improve sexual performance.  No supplement has ever been shown effective for that problem – only pharmaceuticals work.

If you aren’t aware of the company I chose to partner with, I have easy and transparent answers to these questions.

  • Yes, Shaklee sponsors Olympic athletes.  We have nearly 100 athletes and a total of 144 medals to our team’s credit.  That’s a lot of hard work (and a lot of supplements)!  Learn more about the Shaklee Pure Performance Team at this link.  No athlete ever has, or ever will, fail a drug test due to a Shaklee product.
  • Over 100 publications is a LOT of science to Shaklee’s credit.  Published in respected journals like Nutrition, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, and Journal of Gastroenterology.  You can check out research Shaklee has sponsored about athletic performance, weight management, blood sugar support and other topics at this link.
  • Every lot of raw materials is tested for 350 different contaminants like pesticides, molds, heavy metals and other toxins before it is accepted to make Shaklee products.  Shaklee is BETTER than organic, since organic products can still become contaminated in many ways.  In addition, over 100,000 quality tests are done every year on finished products before they head out to customers.  Shaklee has never had a recall.  They don’t need to!  And if you have a problem, everything is guaranteed, even if you just don’t like a flavor.  You call me, or your distributor if it’s not me, and it gets fixed.  Period.

Again and again, we see in the news reports that supplements aren’t safe, that supplements don’t work, that supplements are at best a waste of money or at worst dangerous to your health.  This isn’t true.  Nutritional supplements are a vital part of supporting health and optimizing outcomes for athletes as well as for the rest of us.  It’s just important to make sure you know what you’re buying!

QUESTION:  Do you take supplements?  Why or why not?  Is this information surprising to you?

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